Nearing the end of its pilot, the Newton-funded UK and Malaysia Green Data Centre project brought together world-class innovators – Dearman, Green Data Center LLP, Heriot-Watt University and Universiti Teknologi Malaysia.

The project’s aim was to improve the sustainability of data centres. Over half the electricity consumed by these centres is for cooling – changing the way a data centre is cooled represents an important step towards making the digital world a much greener place to interact and do business.

The next generation green data centre in Klang Valley features cutting-edge liquid submersion cooling technologies alongside a Dearman engine, offering clean, sustainable back-up power and cooling.

The project brings together innovative technologies developed in Malaysia and received backing in 2016 from the UK government’s Newton Fund – its aim to reduce energy consumption by 50% and reduce emissions caused by diesel back-up generators.

There are around eight million private and commercial data centres globally, with the digital world predicted to grow 44 times between 2009 and 2020. Current data centres consume about three percent of the global electricity supply and contribute for about two percent of total greenhouse gas emissions and the amount of energy used by data centres is doubling every four years.

Commenting, Adam Payne, Senior Project Engineer, said:
“There is a clear rising demand for energy use in data centres. The development of a clean sustainable data centre demonstrates how the Dearman engine can benefit a range of technologies without adding harmful pollutants to the local area. The Green Data Centre has been an exciting opportunity to grow Dearman’s capabilities.”

The Dearman engine is driven by the expansion of liquid nitrogen, and crucially the only emission is air or nitrogen, with no harmful emissions of NOx, CO2 or particulates. Find out more about the revolutionary Dearman engine here.

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